Anil Rao - MSCI
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Anil Rao

Anil Rao
Executive Director, Equity Applied Research

About the Contributor

Anil Rao is an Executive Director in the Equity Applied Research team. He works with asset owners and managers on using MSCI indexes and analytics for portfolio management. Anil has an MBA from the University of California at Berkeley and an MS from Columbia University. He holds a BS from the University of California at Los Angeles. He is a CFA Charterholder.

Blog posts by Anil Rao

  1. With new tariffs in effect as of July 6, we investigate our earlier assertion that “while an expanded trade war could lead to a ‘lose-lose’ outcome, there could be greater impact for stocks in the U.S. Overall, they are more exposed to the Chinese economy than the other way around.”

  2. Investors eager to write the obituary of the size premium might want to put down their pens. Small-cap stocks in developed markets outside the U.S. have been on a decade-long run of outpacing their large- and mid-cap counterparts.

  3. How did different equity factors fare during the past week’s market turmoil? When markets are gyrating, it can be difficult to figure out just what is happening. Real-time data provides greater insight into market events as they unfold.

  4. The emerging markets rally, the U.S. dollar’s depreciation and the resurgence of global growth were the top three drivers behind a double-digit rally in global equities last year. Stocks were led by the MSCI Emerging Markets Index’s 38% return. Developed markets, as represented by the MSCI World Index, returned 23% last year. As we enter 2018, investors will monitor whether these themes continue into the New Year.

  5. Over the last decade, asset owners have implemented factor investment programs with a focus on domestic markets. Increasingly, they are also funding equity factor programs in international markets. Two catalysts are driving this trend. First, there has been a steady erosion in asset owners’ home biases, leading to more passive and active international mandates. Second, investment committees and boards of trustees have become more comfortable with using factors as a complement to core passive and traditional active allocations.

  6. When markets get volatile, stock prices can move very quickly in a short period. As we saw in the August 2007 “quant liquidity crunch”— now about to mark its 10-year anniversary — many quantitative equity managers could have benefitted from getting market insights in real time as they found themselves in crowded trades.

  7. How can asset owners integrate an equity factor allocation into their existing roster of active managers? There is no one answer that suits all. The response may be different for each asset owner, depending on its investment beliefs, goals and risk tolerance.

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